Monday, November 05, 2012

Canada Is Threat to World Peace Today, Not Iran

Canada is threat to world peace today, not Iran

Monday, 05 November 2012 00:00
Stephen Gowans

Canada has severed diplomatic relations with Iran, a country it decries as “the most significant threat to global peace and security in the world today,” and it has done so as part of the Harper government’s re-orienting Canada’s foreign policy to more vigorously back Israel. But it is Israel — which daily clamours for an attack on Iran and threatens to undertake one itself — that is the greatest current threat to world peace and international security.

Canada has withdrawn its diplomats from Tehran and ordered Iran’s out of Canada.

Ottawa says it has suspended diplomatic relations because Iran is:
--Providing military assistance to the Syrian government;
--Refuses to comply with UN resolutions pertaining to its nuclear programme;
--Routinely threatens the existence of Israel;
--Engages in racist anti-Semitic rhetoric and incitement to genocide;
--Is among the world’s worst violators of human rights;
--Shelters and materially supports terrorist groups.

Given rampant speculation in Canada about the real reasons Ottawa has suddenly broken off relations with Iran, it’s clear that Ottawa’s purported reasons have been dismissed as empty rhetoric.

And so they should be.

If Ottawa were genuinely concerned about the world’s worst violators of human rights giving military assistance to tyrannical regimes to put down peaceful uprisings, it would have shut its embassy in Saudi Arabia long ago.

Human Rights Watch describes rights violations in Saudi Arabia, an absolute monarchy that refuses to tolerate meaningful democratic reforms, as “pervasive.”

And when Bahrainis rose up in peaceful protest against their country’s despotic rulers last year, Saudi troops and tanks spilled into the country to help Bahrain’s absolute monarchy violently suppress the uprising.

Canadian diplomats remain on station in both countries.

The United States refuses to comply with innumerable UN resolutions to lift its illegal blockade on Cuba, and yet Ottawa continues to maintain diplomatic relations with Washington.

UN resolutions in connection with the Palestinians are regularly ignored by Israel, but all the same Canadian diplomats are not withdrawn from Tel Aviv.

Indeed, Israel offers multiple reasons for Ottawa to close its embassy in that country and boot Israeli diplomats out of Canada.

Human Rights Watch describes conditions in territories occupied by Israel as a “human rights crisis.”

Within Israel proper, Arabs are treated as second-class citizens, subordinate to the favoured children, the Jews.

Israel’s record of furnishing military aid to repressive, retrograde regimes is long and shameful.

After the Carter administration suspended military aid to the Chilean regime of Augusto Pinochet in 1977, Israel stepped in to become the dictator’s major arms supplier.

Israel ran guns to Iran soon after the 1979 Islamic Revolution, to fan the flames of war between Iran and Iraq, and before that was a major supporter of the Shah’s dictatorial, human rights charnel house.

In the 1970s, it entered into a secret military alliance with South Africa’s racist apartheid regime, offering to sell it nuclear weapons.

As for the Canadian government’s professed opposition to nuclear weapons proliferation, Tel Aviv’s nuclear programme should be ringing alarm bells in Ottawa. Israel is estimated to have some 200 nuclear weapons.

It refuses to hear any discussion about giving them up, won’t join the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty, and bars international inspectors from entering the country.

By contrast, the Iranians have no nuclear weapons — and as US military and intelligence officials continue to affirm — there is no evidence they’re working to acquire them (see here, here, here, here, here, and here.) More than that, there is evidence of absence.

“Certain things are not being done,” a former US intelligence official told the Washington Post, that would have to be done were the Iranians working to weaponise their civilian nuclear energy programme.

And unlike Israel, Iran is a member of the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty.

Its nuclear facilities are regularly scrutinised by international inspectors. And while it is true that Tehran refuses to comply with some UN resolutions related to its civilian nuclear programme, it does so because the resolutions would uniquely deny its right to process uranium — a right the non-proliferation treaty guarantees.

And as for supporting terrorists, in the early 1980s Tel Aviv groomed Christian Phalangist right-wing militias to act as Israel’s proconsul in Lebanon.

When a bomb killed the Phalanges’ leader Bashir Jumayal, who had been recently elected president, the militias went on a rampage, terrorising Palestinians and Shiite Lebanese in the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps in Beirut. As the Phalanges rampaged through the camps, killing men, women and children, the Israeli army threw up a cordon around the camps, firing flares into the night sky to provide illumination to help the terrorists do their grisly work.

Far worse is the reality that the Israeli state was founded on terrorism. For one thing, Zionists used terrorism to try to drive the British out of mandate Palestine, bombing the King David hotel, headquarters of the British mandate authority, in 1946. But that was small potatoes compared to what was to come.

Exhausted, and no longer willing to administer Palestine, the British transferred responsibility to the UN in 1947. Over the objections of the majority Arab inhabitants, the UN developed a partition plan which would allocate 56 percent of mandate Palestine to a Jewish state.

Jews made up only one-third of the population.

The Arabs, two-thirds of the population, would receive only 42 percent (Jerusalem, the remaining two percent, would become an international city).

The Jewish state would have a rough demographic balance of 500 000 Jews and 400 000 Arabs (the Arab state 800 000 Arabs and 100 000 Jews.) Recognising that a democratic Jewish state could not long exist without a preponderance of Jews, Zionists terrorised Arab villages to depopulate them, sending hundreds of thousands of Arab Palestinians fleeing for safety.

They were later barred from returning. Zionists claim the Arabs fled only to get out of the way of advancing armies from neighbouring Arab states. But the terror, formalised as Plan Dalet, was well underway before the Arab armies intervened.

In the end, the Zionists seized 80 percent of Palestinian territory, and were only prevented from seizing all of it by the intervention of Egypt and Jordan.

What’s more, Canada might consider its own support for terrorists. Some Canadian military officers who had participated in last year’s Nato air war against the government of Libya referred to Nato jets bombing Gaddafi’s troops as “al-Qaeda’s air force,” a recognition that Islamist terrorists made up part of the opposition that Nato, with Canada’s participation, intervened on behalf of.

As for the Canadian government’s claim that Iran “routinely threatens the existence of Israel,” this is pure wind. Tehran is certainly hostile to Zionism — the idea that European Jewish settlers, through a programme of ethnic cleansing, have a legitimate right to found a state on someone else’s land.

And there can be little doubt that Iran is ready to do all it can to facilitate the demise of the Zionist regime.

But the notion that Iran has the intention — even the capability — to bring about the physical destruction of Israel is absurd in the extreme.

Iran is severely outclassed militarily by Israel, and its possession of a handful of nuclear weapons — if it were ever to acquire them — would be no match for Israel’s hundreds, or the formidable military might of Israel’s sponsor, the United States.

The idea that Iran threatens Israel is a silly fiction cooked up by Israeli warmongers to justify an attack on Iran to prevent the latter from ever acquiring even the potential to develop nuclear weapons in order to preserve Tel Aviv’s monopoly of nuclear terror in the Middle East.

Canadian politicians simply ape the line that Israel is threatened, a canard Zionists have used since 1948 to justify their aggressions.

On the contrary, it is Israel — a super-power-sponsored nuclear weapons state — which threatens Iran, to say nothing of Syria and Lebanon.

So why has Ottawa really suspended diplomatic relations with Tehran? Iran’s foreign minister Ali Akbar Salehi says Canada’s government is “neo-conservative”, “extremist”, and “boundlessly defending international Zionism.” These are apt descriptions.

Canada has practically outsourced its Middle East foreign policy to Israel, letting it be known that it will unquestioningly prop up Israeli interests.

Extremist? Since Ottawa’s outsourcing of Middle East foreign policy to Israel yokes Canada to a bellicose regime with an atrocious human rights record, how could it be otherwise?

But Salehi’s description, no matter how apt, does not explain why Ottawa has severed ties with Iran now.

Former Canadian ambassador to Iran John Mundy raises the possibility that Ottawa is pulling its diplomats out of the country in anticipation of a unilateral Israeli strike on Iran.

Since Canada has offered unqualified support to Israel, Canadian diplomats would be in danger if Israel followed through on its threats.

Britain recalled its diplomats when, last November, protesters stormed the British Embassy in Tehran. Canada may be seeking to avoid a similar occurrence.

Ottawa may have no specific knowledge of an impending Israeli strike, but may be playing it safe all the same. Or it might be participating in an Israeli-sponsored ruse to ratchet up psychological pressure on Tehran, withdrawing its diplomats to falsely signal an imminent Israeli strike.

Whatever the case, it’s clear that Canada has adopted the extremist position of supporting a rogue regime in Tel Aviv that, to quote Ottawa’s misplaced description of Iran, is “the most significant threat to global peace and security in the world today.”


Stephen Gowans is a Canadian writer based in Ottawa.

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